College Kids (and applications)

Image result for dead poets society
because Dead Poet’s Society is life

someone please save us,
us college kids!
what my parents told me
is what i did
they said go to school and
be a college kid
but in the end
i questioned why i did

-Relient K, “College Kids”

It’s the time of year when seniors are sending off some last minute applications and juniors are starting to realize, “Oh hey! I actually need to start working on this.” This is the same for international students. In our eleventh grade SAT/College Prep class here in El Salvador we are discussing/workshopping successful college applications. Sometimes the strength of the college application can be the difference between being accepted or being rejected or wait-listed (the university equivalent to purgatory). Now, college admissions seem to be trending towards Common App type essays–short essays on a wide range of creative topics–rather than one, general essay outlining the applicants’ desires and merits for applying. But the latter form of admissions essay still exists. Regardless, I decided to post on here the contents of a document I put together for my students compiled from various resources and successful applications. The document can also be downloaded here.

Maybe this could help someone you know. Maybe this is you right now. Happy applying!

Things to Remember When Preparing Your College Application Essay

  1. Be interesting

Creative. Attention-getting. If you are writing a competitive essay (of course there are universities with a high acceptance rate and the strength of the application essay is not that necessary for acceptance—but hey, why not “knock it out of the park” anyway?) JUST SAY NO to generic writing. What is generic? Well, of course application-readers are subjective, but no one wants to read some second-rate, copied-and-pasted Google search result. “I really want to study at your university. I’m really smart. You should pick me.” If that’s all you’re really saying, don’t waste everyone’s time by somehow turning that into 500 words. Finally, though statistics and quotes have been go-to attention-getters for years and years, I would recommend a better, post-modern approach: TELL STORIES! For example, instead of simply mentioning what you’re interested in studying, tell a story about how that passion was created in you. “When I was four years old my mom set me down in front of the television while she was cleaning the kitchen. It’s one of my first memories in life, but I remember staring entranced as ballet dancers glided across the stage, moving their bodies in a way I didn’t think possible. Ever since then, I knew I was supposed to be a dancer.” “If you’re not careful, your childhood toys might just dictate your future. I was sitting in my room with a brand new Lego set. Unbeknownst to me then, that Lego pirate-ship would initiate an unquenchable appetite for architectural design.” “I was dead. And then I was not. I had flat-lined, but the work of incredible doctors brought me back to life. That pivotal experience has created in me a desire to help others just as I was helped. I want to be a doctor.” This leads into the next point.

  1. Be personal

Application readers don’t care too much about how some random stranger has the sufficient grades to pass their classes. They want to know some special, unique individual will add to the rich cultural life of their university. Like the previous point, this is about telling stories. You don’t have to spend three quarters of your essay telling one long story, but you can weave in anecdotes as you go along. If you have unique life-experiences (maybe you’ve traveled lot) or you’ve overcome adversity or you come from a foreign country, the application reader should know that by the end of your essay.

  1. Be specific/concrete

Don’t just say you’re a hard-worker, a leader, independent, self-motivated, smart. These all sound great, but their just words until you can specifically state what makes you these. If you’re a leader, share that experience in which you led a group of peers for a shoe drive. Or mention that you typically take the lead in group assignments and get positive feedback for your contribution.

  1. Answer the question/prompt

This may sound like a no-brainer, but make sure to address the question or prompt. If you are supposed to write why you would be a good candidate for the university and you only discuss your passion for engineering and how great of an engineering program the university has, you have not answered the prompt. Now, one might deduce that your passion for engineering is a reason why you are a good candidate, but it is the applicant’s job to be direct. Don’t make the reader play guessing games.

  1. Share what YOU add to the program

This is related to the second point, be personal, but as you discuss strengths and such, make sure to share what you bring to the university that will enhance the environment. Do you bring a certain artistic creativity that is often lacking in engineering programs? How (be specific, remember)? Are you from another country? How does this increase the diversity and global atmosphere of the university? Let’s just be real; universities crave diversity. If that’s you, YOU BETTER MENTION THAT. But even if you’re not from another country, you have a unique, cultural heritage. For example, I went to a small university in a rural setting, but I graduated from high school in a metropolitan area. I brought to my university a more urban/suburban experience that was different than many of my peers.

  1. State your career goals

Don’t just stop at your desired degree; share your career goals. As vulgar as it sounds, universities are businesses. They want their “brand” to be connected to the success of their students. So how will your career goals innovate that job or academic field? How will it positively impact that region of the world? I have a student who wants to revolutionize the fashion industry so that products are always sourced ethically, solving a major industry problem. Competitive universities that have the ability to be picky want to choose the type of students that will help their image. Conversely, state specifically how the university helps you achieve those goals/dreams.

  1. Structure

Give your essay structure. Again, this isn’t a research paper, but you should still organize your thoughts. Below is a sample structure, and each new Roman numeral would make a simple paragraph break. Besides the introduction and conclusion, the structure doesn’t necessarily need to be in this order, but it needs to be organized and flow logically.

 

Sample College Application Essay Structure

  • (I) Introduction/Attention-getter
  • (II) (optional) Why the university is great

This one isn’t always necessary, but for some applicants there may be non-academic reasons to study at the university. Perhaps it is one of the most diverse student bodies. Perhaps it is located in a great city where there are a lot of cultural opportunities. Perhaps the architecture on campus was mesmerizing. Perhaps it is indirectly related to academics like a stellar library.

  • (III) Area of study
    1. Why it interests you (great place for a personal story)
    2. Career goals
      1. How the school helps you
      2. How you help the school
  • (IV) Strengths
    1. Life-experiences
      1. Extra-curricular school activities
      2. Awards
      3. Volunteer work
      4. Paid work
    2. Positive characteristics (be specific)
    3. Cultural heritage
  • (V) Conclusion

Here is a great place to tie everything back together and succinctly finish your essay.

 

 

Sample Application Essay (578 words)

You never know what might grab your heart unexpectedly. I’ve grown up reading and have always enjoyed it, but for most of my life reading has merely been a pastime, nothing more. That is, until the end of college—not the best timing. I remember staring transfixed at my friend’s computer screen as I finished watching—feeling!—an emotionally-charged spoken-word poem. I was fascinated at the power of language and art. Strangely enough, it was that moment that initiated an unquenchable pursuit of art and literature, and it is this reason that I am pursuing a second degree in literature at SNHU.

One of the greatest appeals of SNHU is its accessibility and support for non-traditional students like me. I have already finished undergraduate and graduate degrees in other fields, and I am working full time, so I need a program that will support this reality. SNHU does that. Not only that, however, but SNHU is one of the top online universities, so it was an immediate attraction for me. I know it will support my passion and my new career direction.

There are multiple reasons that I would like to study literature at SNHU. On one level, I am simply curious; I am a learner, and I want to gain knowledge in this area. I want to rediscover beloved stories that I’ve already read, and I want to open my mind to new stories, new manners of looking at the world. I simply desire to learn. However, on a more practical level, I hope to use literature in my future career. I have spent most of my life in various mentoring roles as a pastor and a store manager, and so the field of high school education has become very appealing to me. It allows me to combine both teaching and literature in a way that will better satisfy my vocational desires. I have already done the research, and there are various alternative tracks to obtain a teaching certificate after graduating from SNHU.

Though my journey to arrive at applying to SNHU has not exactly been normal, I believe that it is this very journey that makes me such a strong candidate for your university. My previous degrees are in religion, and though they are not technically literary degrees, they are still in the field of the humanities and compliment literature. In fact, I have already demonstrated my literary potential by obtaining a 4.0 in two graduate level literature classes. Furthermore, I was an academic honors student in my previous university, I was the student speaker at my graduation ceremony, and I was an award-winning speaker on our debate team. I have also traveled extensively, an attribute that will allow me to bring a unique cultural perspective to SNHU’s online community. I have always scored well academically, and I believe that I have demonstrated both my ability to thrive in a literature program as well as to bring a unique voice to the learning environment.

The arts are a dying breed. Science seems to rule the day. But there is a distinct community of passionate writers, artists, and thinkers that know that beauty, that art, will save the world, that it will add life and color and meaning. I am one of those people. Thus, I am excited for the tools that SNHU will provide which will equip me to grow in the field of literature and to pass on that same passion to the next generation.

 

Adventure: Reflection and Looking Ahead

 

Seven years ago today I embarked on an incredibly transformative life-adventure: backpacking through Europe by myself for 3.5 months as a freshly graduated 22 year old.

I spent time journaling and reflecting this morning. Here’s today’s entry:

January 14 [2017]:

On this day seven years ago I flew from St. Louis to Dublin. That experience ended up being one of the most transformative of my life. In some ways I can directly link to that experience as a point in which everything changed. I learned to see life differently. I grew independent. I grew quieter and more reflective. I became imaginative and wanted to see the world through experience rather than didactic moralism. I fell deeper in love with books and writing and creativity and art. I have wanted to explore the depths of knowledge and adventure. Suddenly I was dissatisfied with a normal (9-5) life. Some might say I’ve become “unhinged” ever since; I’d just say “unsettled.”

When we have experiences such as these there’s a temptation to try and re-create them. But we can’t; it does disservice to the memory and the experience. In a sense, we can’t look back in life. We can look in the mirror (self-reflection and growth), but we can’t turn around. Re-creating sublime moments is a sort of prostitution [soiling what is supposed to be pure]: we’re plucking at the divine fruit we were meant to taste once. We forget we’re in the garden of mystery where every tree bears a different fruit. Savor that which you’ve already enjoyed, remember it, cherish it, but search for new fruit.

I’m thankful for the adventure that started my adventures. Let’s keep moving forward.

Since that trip in 2010 I’ve had the incredible privilege of backpacking around Scotland (and the West Highland Way), hiking the Na Pali coastline, traveling and getting my CELTA in S. America (Ecuador and Peru), Scotland again to hike with a friend, and Italy with my family. I now live in El Salvador. I’m not rich monetarily; but I’m rich in experience. Travel itself will not fill emptiness in your life–it will not “fix” you. You can be filled in so many ways. Nevertheless, don’t settle for mundane. Keep pushing at the seams of life.

Here’s a link to my inactive blog that recounts my Europe trip in full: Go.

Finally, read it or don’t, but below is a final piece of warning/advice. Happy Saturday!

 

[Note: As I scan webpages here and there, I want to leave this warning/advice to any readers. Don’t commercialize travel. I hope that’s not what I’m doing by blogging about this. There are a zillion travel tips and organizations and resources (many of them helpful, many of them that I have used from time to time), but don’t lose the spirit of travel. It’s not an industry for some Fat Cat to get rich off of…feeding into the Western world’s dissatisfaction with life. Travel, done correctly, is painfully intimate–no one can understand your experience like you can. It is sublime. It is mysterious and soul-seeking. Stepping out, I mean really stepping out, was never meant to be a two-second affair, snapping off a bunch of photos and scampering back to safe and normal. Now, it’s okay to return to what the world might call “normal” because YOU know that you’re no longer normal, and you adjust your life accordingly. You bring that spirit of change and  new eyes back with you. I feel that I’m rambling a bit here; I don’t know how to put this into words. But I see some people’s travel posts and sites, etc. from time to time, and it seems that they are more interested in how their experiences are perceived by others rather than letting those moments be their own. Remember when Sean O’Connell in Walter Mitty explains that “If I like a moment, for me, personally, I don’t like to have the distraction of the camera…”? Leaving aside the irony of using a major Hollywood quote to make my point, let’s take a page out of O’Connell’s book and not feel the need to prostitute our moments, OUR OWN. Let’s pursue truth and beauty and self-discovery, not gimmicky tourism-industry shenanigans. I hope this makes sense. Thanks guys!]

Faustus Makes a Deal with…Will Ferrell?

This week in my online Renaissance class we are reading Christopher Marlowe’s famous play, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus. In the play Faustus makes a deal with the devil in exchange for a life of decadence for twenty-four years on earth. In addition to various other tasks, we were asked to analyze the continued effects of Marlowe’s narrative on contemporary culture. I chose SNL’s “The Devil Can’t Write a Love Song” featuring Garth Brooks as Milo, an uninspired musician willing to sell his soul for a hit song to Lucifer, aka Will Ferrell. Please enjoy!

The Top and Bottom of My Wish List

imrs

My reading list is BIG… REAL BIG. And it’s always growing. At times I make the mistake of going out and buying a book as a way of adding it to my list even if I’m not ready at that exact moment to read it. Bad idea. Because by the time I get around to reading the book, something else has been added to my list, and it’s jumped to the top. I have lists in my head, lists on my computer, lists in the form of purchased books on my shelf. However, probably the most thorough and consistent list I have kept is on Amazon. Thanks Amazon…because I don’t always buy those books from your website; it’s just a handy way to catalog the books I’d like to read. So I thought it’d be fun to revisit my reading wish list and see how it’s evolved (or how it hasn’t). Thus, I will share my five oldest added books and my five most recently added books, none of which I have already read. Some of them represent areas that I already know a lot about and want to know more; others represent areas both of ignorance and fascination.

Oldest… (all added in 2010)

Newest… (all added in 2016)

 

So that does it! This has been an interesting experiment. Does anyone else want to share some of their list? Or add to mine with a good recommendation?

“What is Literature for?”

What-is-Literature-For

HERE is a wonderful video put together by The School of Life group. As in everything, we should not assume that our learners have answered the question: “Yes, but why is this important?” As a literature student and teacher, I know why I love my subject. But do my students? We need to help make that connection for them. If we really believe it’s important, let’s not assume.

In class we will be examining the importance of literature, but I do not have time (this year) to incorporate this video into my lesson plan. I wanted to post it, though, for any of my students or other teachers who might enjoy its content. Weighing in at just under 5 minutes, it’s a great tool to ignite this discussion: “What is literature for?”

 

Learning to Love to Read

The Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice:

*This is the first post. If you aren’t familiar with the purpose of the blog, please check out the page “Mr. Caleb” to learn more.

Like nearly everything in life, reading is a discipline. It takes time and practice to develop good reading skills. But for many people I know, there’s also that book (or series of books) that really made them fall in love with reading. For me, it was The Chronicles of Narnia. There’s something powerful about tapping into our imagination… something that I hope happens this year in our classes. Personally, I think a room full of books is magical and inspiring in and of itself. So click here to read Buzzfeed’s “The 30 Best Places To Be If You Love Books.”